Ugni molinae invaded patches in Robinson Crusoe Island: Are there native and endemic plants able to live within them?

  • Diego Alarc´ón Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile
  • Patricio López-Sepúlveda Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile
  • Glenda Fuentes Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile
  • Hellen Montoya Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile
  • Patricio Peñailillo Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de Talca, Talca, Chile
  • Pedro Carrasco Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile
Keywords: invasive species, Juan Fernández, Robinson Crusoe, Ugni molinae, Gaultheria racemulosa, endemic plants

Abstract

It is unknown if any Juan Fernández native plants may tolerate the aggressive invasion of the introduced shrub Ugni molinae. We found sixteen native species growing within these highly invaded patches. The endemic shrub Gaultheria racemulosa (syn. Pernettya rigida) was the most important species according to vegetation cover in invaded patches, therefore relevant in future control management options.

Author Biography

Pedro Carrasco, Departamento de Botánica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Oceanográficas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile

 

Published
2019-06-30
Section
SHORT COMMUNICATIONS